Skip to content

5 Food Documentaries to Check Out this #WorldFoodDay

October 14, 2016

Sunday, October 16 is World Food Day, a day of action against hunger on a global scale. It celebrates the founding of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), whose core mission is achieving global food security. World Food Day is a day where people around the world come together to declare their commitment to eradicate hunger in our lifetime.

Growing Chefs!‘s vision is a world with healthy, sustainable food practices and our Classroom Gardening and Cooking Programs are designed to teach children and their families about these practices. We stand with many other organizations working tirelessly to do the same, at all parts of the food cycle, and we believe that every day should be World Food Day, as no one should have to go hungry.

This year’s theme is Climate is changing. Food and agriculture must too,” focusing on the impact of a changing environment on food security.

14647395_10155340626073135_1063538012_oFarmers are already dealing with climate change-related challenges, such as higher temperatures, changing rainfall patterns, shifting growing seasons, and extreme weather events. Agriculture is at the center of climate change-related issues; being the most impacted by climate change while at the same time being a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. However, this means food production can also play a major role in reducing the effects of climate change and as such we are already seeing a shift in farming practices and consumer sourcing.

We can all do our part – growing our own gardens, sourcing from local, sustainable farms, and making informed food choices.

To recognize #WorldFoodDay, and to inspire you to think more about where our food comes from, we have put together this list of a few food documentaries to check out this weekend.

  1. Food, Inc.

food-inc

Who it’s for: Those that really want an inside look at food production in the US.
About:  An Academy Award-nominated American documentary film that examines corporate farming in the United States. Its focus is on the environmental, social, economic, and health impacts of agribusiness. While jarring at times, the film does offer a surprisingly hopeful message: Making informed food purchases really does matter.

Note: Sequences of this film do show industrial animal farms and practices that may be disturbing to some viewers and may not be suitable for small children.

  1. A Place at the Table

a-place-at-the-table

Who it’s for: Those interested in food security issues.

About: Not just talking to experts about food security, this film goes to the source visiting different “food desert” communities, such as the urban streets of Philadelphia and a rural town in Colorado. The filmmakers talk directly with the families there who live on extremely limited incomes with poor access to food. Not only focusing on the issues, this film also highlights local food heroes and many inspiring individuals who are working to help.

  1. More Than Honey

more-than-honey

Who it’s for: Anyone interested in the fascinating networks and impacts of bees.

About: We’d be remiss not to include a film about the impact of bees on food production. The bees are disappearing, and if they go the impacts on our world food supply would be huge. The cinematography in this film is simply stunning as the filmmakers draw you into the intimate world of the bees while describing the plight they face.

4. Ingredients: The Local Food Movement Takes Root

ingredients1

Who it’s for: Those with an interest in the growing local food movement.

About:  Growers, restaurateurs, and consumers across the United States share their insights and methods for growing the local food movement.  If you love thought leaders of the locavore movement like Alice Waters and Peter Hoffman you will enjoy this film as they discuss their experience with local food while drawing attention to the dangers of America’s industrialized food system. A beautiful film about how we can bring our food production back home.

  1. Just Eat It

wr-just-eat-it

Who it’s for: Anyone interested in food waste issues and solutions.

About: An award-winning, B.C. produced film that emerged after the producers discovered that while one in ten people in North America go hungry, collectively we are throwing out nearly 50% of our food. Expiry dates, perfect produce, portion sizes, Just Eat It brings together farmers, organizations, and consumers to reveal the issue of food waste and its sources while examining its devastating consequences around the globe.

 

-Amanda Adams
Growing Chefs! Program Coordinator

Advertisements

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: